Climate change may influence US election

A study by the Yale University Project on Climate Change Communication has indicated that climate change may have a greater impact on the outcome of the US election than many pundits currently expect.

The study, based on poll results, states that 7% of electors remain undecided regarding their vote for President:

  • Most undecided likely voters (80%) believe that global warming is happening, while only 3% say it is not happening – which is very similar to likely Obama voters (86% and 4%, respectively).
  • Undecideds are markedly different than likely Romney voters, fewer than half of whom believe global warming is happening (45%). In fact, one in three likely Romney voters say it is not happening.
  • While two out of three likely Obama voters (66%) believe that most scientists think global warming is happening, few likely Romney voters do (22%) – a three to one margin.
  • Though few likely voters say global warming is the “single-most important” issue to them in this election, majorities of both likely Obama voters (75%) and Undecideds (61%) say it will be one of several important issues determining their vote for President. The issue is of notably less importance to likely Romney voters.
  • Undecideds as well as likely Obama voters say that President Obama (64% and 61% respectively) and Congress (72% and 78%) should be “doing more” about global warming.
  • There is broad agreement among all likely voters – including likely Romney voters – that the U.S. should use more renewable energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, and geothermal) in the future.
  • About four out of ten Undecideds and likely Romney voters (40% and 36% respectively) – say they could “easily change their mind” about global warming.

The study report is available at http://environment.yale.edu/climate/news/global-warming-2012-election/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s